Gå til hovedinnhold

Report: Incidents in connection with diving

Two incidents involving minor personal injuries and one near-miss hazardous situation were reported in 2012 in connection with saturation diving in connection with petroleum activities. This is discussed in the Petroleum Safety Authority Norway’s (PSA’s) report from the DSYS diving database.


This year’s report contains statistics and analyses based on data from the period 1985-2012.

Activity level
In 2012, the saturation diving* activity level was 40,464 man-hours in saturation. This is a reduction of approximately 8% compared with 2011. A higher activity level is expected in 2013.

There was little activity (63 man-hours in water) related to surface-oriented* diving on the Norwegian shelf in 2012. The activity level for surface-oriented diving is generally significantly lower than for saturation diving.

* Definitions:
Saturation diving: The diver works from a diving bell (which transports the diver under pressure from a chamber on the ship to the work site) and remains under pressure in a chamber on the diving vessel in between work sessions (bell runs).

Surface-oriented diving: The diver enters the water on the surface, performs the job at the relevant working depth (less than 50-metre water depth), and returns to the surface. Additional compression/decompression in a chamber could be involved in such diving operations.

Few injuries
The DSYS overview shows that there have been relatively few personal injuries in connection with saturation diving in the past 25 years.

In 2011, two incidents in the form of minor personal injuries were reported. One was related to moderate back pain in connection with excess back strain, while the other was a minor hand injury.

A near-miss hazardous situation was also reported in connection with a leak/rupture in the gas supply hose.